Archive for the ‘Audio’ Category

Frequency Filtering with the Audio Hacker Shield

The Audio Hacker shield for Arduino lets you do some cool things with digital signal processing. This new project shows how a fairly simple Arduino sketch can implement a low-pass filter, high-pass filter and band-pass filter.

A low-pass filter allows low frequencies to pass through (makes sense, right?) while attenuating or cutting out the frequencies that are higher than a specified cutoff frequency.

A high-pass filter is the opposite. It lets high frequencies through while attenuating frequencies below the cutoff frequency.

A band-pass filter lets frequencies that are near the cutoff frequency to pass through but attenuates the frequencies above and below it.

There is a new example sketch included in the Audio Hacker library called “Filter” that implements these 3 filters. In the video below I’m using the DJ Shield to make it easy to provide inputs but it is not strictly required. An audio source is plugged into the Audio Hacker input. A pot connected to A0 controls the cutoff frequency. A button on digital pin 5 starts/stops the audio processing, and a button on digital pin 4 controls the filter selection. I’m lighting up the red LED for low-pass filter, blue LED for high-pass filter, and both LEDs for band-pass filter.

Now shown in the video is the effect of the filter resonance. The pot conntected to A1 controls the resonance of the filter. Resonance amplifies the frequencies around the cutoff frequency, and has an especially cool effect when using a low-pass filter.

The resonant filter implemented here is adapted from the code here. I hope this simple project lets you hear how different filters sound and gives you something new to explore with your Audio Hacker shield!


Published by Michael, on September 22nd, 2015 at 6:55 am. Filed under: Arduino,Audio. | 1 Comment |

Using a Video Experimenter as MIDI Controller

This simple project shows how a video signal captured by a Video Experimenter Shield can be used to send MIDI messages to a synthesizer. A small camera module is connected to the input of the Video Experimenter (the red wire in the picture is for powering the camera from the Arduino VIN pin). The video output goes to a small TV. A MIDI shield sits atop the Video Experimenter to allow the Arduino to send MIDI messages to a Synthino XM synthesizer. By the way, the Synthino XM is our new synthesizer product and you can read all about it on synthino.com. It’s awesome.

Video Experimeter as MIDI Controller


The Arduino sketch uses the Video Experimenter’s frame capture ability to capture simple monochrome low-res frames. The “on” pixels are counted to determine the pitch of the note that should be sent to the synthesizer. The code then just sends a MIDI note-on message to play a note on the synth. The brigher the image (more “on” pixels) sends higher pitched notes. In the video you can see me adjusting the Video Experimenter threshold knob to alter the brightness and also shining a flashlight on the camera.

You can download the code and make sure you install the enhanced TVout library from the Video Experimenter product page.


Published by Michael, on September 5th, 2015 at 1:24 pm. Filed under: Arduino,Audio,Video. | No Comments |

Synthino XM Polyphonic Synthesizer Now Available for ALL

Synthino_Full_blue_cropped_title


After a successfully funded Kickstarter campaign, the Synthino XM is finally available to the whole world.
The Synthino XM is by far the most sophisticated device we’ve design here at nootropic design. We had a lot of help from our partner in this project, GetLoFi.
Visit our sister site synthino.com to order this awesome synth for $139. If you like making music or just noise, you won’t find a synth with this many features for this price.

  • 5-note polyphony for superb playability
  • 12 waveforms, 5 drum samples (kick, snare, hi-hat, tom, clap), and noise generator
  • 12-bit audio at 25KHz output rate
  • 4 MIDI channels, each with separate waveform and ADSR envelope settings
  • MIDI over 5-pin MIDI jack or USB
  • MIDI over USB works with DAW software on Mac, Windows, iOS, Android
  • low pass filter with cutoff frequency and resonance controls
  • 2 independent low frequency oscillators (LFOs): pitch and filter
  • selectable waveform for LFOs
  • 1V p-p audio output voltage with enough current to drive headphones
  • arpeggiator mode, up to 16 notes
  • 4 arpeggiator patterns: up, down, up-down, random
  • 4 built-in arpeggiator chords or use MIDI to specify up to 16 notes
  • arpeggiator pitch transposition control
  • tempo control with MIDI clock input
  • 16-step live performance “groovebox” sequencer
  • save/load patches and sequences in EEPROM
  • pitch fine-tuning adjustment
  • programmable/upgradable over USB

Lots more info at synthino.com, including audio tracks, videos and more!


Published by Michael, on July 3rd, 2015 at 4:29 pm. Filed under: Audio. | No Comments |

Synthino XM available through our Kickstarter campaign!

I’ve been working so hard on this new product, and it is finally a reality. Pre-order on Kickstarter!
kickstarterCampaign


Published by Michael, on February 21st, 2015 at 4:34 pm. Filed under: Audio,AVR. | No Comments |